British and American Antislavery Copperation

This book is titled Men and Brothers; Anglo American Antislavery Cooperation. It is by Betty Fladeland. It was published in 1972 by the University of Illinois Press.

Men and Brothers. Betty Freedland

 

You can find the book here at Amazon UK

You can find the book here at Amazon USA

From the Preface:

“Much has been written on both the British and American antislavery movements, but hitherto they have been treated as separate developments. It is the thesis of this book that the struggle in Great Britain and the United States against slavery and the slave trade were so closely connected that they deserve to be studied together”

 

From the back cover

“The United States and Great Britain share a common past in bringing slaves to America and trading slave-grown products. They also worked together to end slavery, although the historical literature up to now has treated the British and American antislavery movements separately. This book traces for the first time the coordination of activities and strategies of abolitionists in Great Britain and the United States from the colonial period through the Civil War and shows that, by the 1830’s, the two movements “were so intertwined they can scarcely be untangled”.

While concerned with what the abolitionists were thinking, Fladeland focuses primarily on what they were doing. Cooperative efforts of churches, religious societies, and outstanding individuals are discussed as well as the efforts of the organised antislavery societies, their exchanges of publications and lectures, and their common problems. Efforts against the slave trade, projects for colonisation of free blacks, and work against slavery in the West Indies and the United Staes are all covered in depth.

By placing the American antislavery movement in a transatlantic setting. Fladeland shows that is was much more than a radical protest movement of a few fanatic and visionaries. It was of¬†some significance in the onset of Civil War because it helped to intensify sectional antagonisms. It has some bearing on the course the British government took during the war and had a great effect on the policies of President Lincoln and the Republican party on the question of slavery”.

BETTY FLADELAND is professor of history at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. She earlier wrote James Gillespie  Birney: Slaveholder to Abolitionist. (1955)

 

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