British and American Antislavery Copperation

This book is titled Men and Brothers; Anglo American Antislavery Cooperation. It is by Betty Fladeland. It was published in 1972 by the University of Illinois Press.

Men and Brothers. Betty Freedland

 

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From the Preface:

“Much has been written on both the British and American antislavery movements, but hitherto they have been treated as separate developments. It is the thesis of this book that the struggle in Great Britain and the United States against slavery and the slave trade were so closely connected that they deserve to be studied together”

 

From the back cover

“The United States and Great Britain share a common past in bringing slaves to America and trading slave-grown products. They also worked together to end slavery, although the historical literature up to now has treated the British and American antislavery movements separately. This book traces for the first time the coordination of activities and strategies of abolitionists in Great Britain and the United States from the colonial period through the Civil War and shows that, by the 1830’s, the two movements “were so intertwined they can scarcely be untangled”.

While concerned with what the abolitionists were thinking, Fladeland focuses primarily on what they were doing. Cooperative efforts of churches, religious societies, and outstanding individuals are discussed as well as the efforts of the organised antislavery societies, their exchanges of publications and lectures, and their common problems. Efforts against the slave trade, projects for colonisation of free blacks, and work against slavery in the West Indies and the United Staes are all covered in depth.

By placing the American antislavery movement in a transatlantic setting. Fladeland shows that is was much more than a radical protest movement of a few fanatic and visionaries. It was of some significance in the onset of Civil War because it helped to intensify sectional antagonisms. It has some bearing on the course the British government took during the war and had a great effect on the policies of President Lincoln and the Republican party on the question of slavery”.

BETTY FLADELAND is professor of history at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. She earlier wrote James Gillespie  Birney: Slaveholder to Abolitionist. (1955)

 

Nottingham in Old Photographs 1944 – 1974

This book is a collection of old photographs of Nottingham.

Nottinghaham

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From the back cover.

“The photographs in his selection, taken in Nottingham between fifteen and fifty years ago, are a nostalgic review of some of the sights and events of the period. Although they depict a time that is still within living memory, the city has undergone considerable change since the end of the Second World war, and many people will be surprised by how much they have forgotten.

Nottingham In Old Photographs

Photographs of the floods of the 1940s, of the railways in the atmospheric days of steam and of the Goose Fair in the years immediately after the war evoke another age altogether and remind us how history is made within our own lifetimes. Some of the most notable pictures how local people celebrating VE Day and the city’s Quincentenary, and views of a number of historic properties which have since disappeared and of the Old Market Square and the activities carried on there will revive many fond memories. Sections on Nottingham people at work and at play recall a time when the pace pf life was a little less hectic than our own, and a series of photographs taken from extraordinary vantage points offer an unusual  view of the city.

Goose Fair Photographs

The photographs are, in the main, the work of three local photographers; the late Frank Stevenson, John Lock and the author (Douglas Whitworth), who is responsible for the majority of the views and whose desire to to chronicle the changing view of his home city has made possible this fascinating visual record of a period which is often overlooked”.

Old Photos of Nottingham

This book was first published in 1991. It has 160 pages.

It has chapters on; The End of the War, The Quincentenary, Streets, Shops, Boots The Chemist, Buildings, The Old Market Square, The Goose Fair, The River Trent (and Floods), Sports and Pastimes, Transport and Views.

 

 

The New Matriarchy. Woman’s Legal Status in History

This book is a critique of the notion that patriarchy is somehow a “natural state of mankind.” It is also a history of woman’s legal place throughout history. It was published in 1965

The New Patriarchy

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From the preface

“…as historians probe back into the twilight period of pre-history, it is becoming accepted that an ancient matriarchy existed when women were both honoured and looked upon as the guiding element in society”.

Index
Index

From the forward

“When I began many years ago to write a short account of the legal position of women from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day, I had no intention of embarking on a wider field. Then someone said to me: “You know, the mere account of the legal position of women affords a very partial view of their actual status at any given period.” This I saw was particularly true in medieval times when the influence of tradition and custom did much to mitigate the position of subjection laid down by Common Law. Gradually I started to collect the material to place a social and economic study guide side by side with the legal one and, in doing so, to endeavour to give a more complete picture of the status of women. Circumstance intervened and the manuscript was forgotten for many years. During this time I had become greatly interested in the Science of Religion, a profound metaphysical  school of thought that bridges the material world of action to the immaterial world of idea. I realised that it is the thoughts of men and their philosophy of life which are the underlying causes of historical development. Thus eventually the present work emerged which views the subjection of women, and their emancipation, a part of the psychological development which cannot be shown without spanning the ages and placing it in the framework of an evolutionary process”.

The Geldermalsen: the Wreck and the Porcelain

GeldermalsenThis is a book about the sinking of the Dutch trading vessel the Geldermalson which was wrecked on a reef in January 1752 as it returned from the East Indies.

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From the preface by Christian Jörg.

“In December 1985 I received a telephone call from Christie’s in Amsterdam. Michael Hatcher had found a new ship with over 150,000 pieces of porcelain. Most of it was already in Amsterdam for an auction in ’86. Perhaps I could come over and have a look.

My acquaintance with Hatcher dates back to 1984. At that time  there was an auction at Christie’s of mid-17th century porcelain, which Hatcher had recovered from the wreck of a Chinese junk. The pieces exceeded everyone’s expectations, to the great disappointment of the museums, whose budget is very limited these days.

Hatcher then donated over 50 pieces to the Groningen Museum as a basis for a public reference collection.

And now Christie’s had called about a much larger find. I’m not likely to forget the visit I paid to Amsterdam shortly after that phone call. We went to a shed in the dock area and there, on wooden racks, I saw endless rows of porcelain, Cups, saucers, plates, bowls…stacks and stacks of them. This is how it must have looked in the days of the Dutch East India Company, I thought. Just a warehouse full of porcelain, in all shapes and sizes, merchandise ready for auction. The warehouse of a large present -day department store looks exactly the same; racks of simple crockery meant for the general public. For a little while it was very difficult to see 18th century Chinese porcelain as something exclusive and rare.

Geldermalson Porcelain
Geldermalson Porcelain

After this first impression, excitement and curiosity got the upper hand. What I saw here corresponded nicely to the pictures I had formed of such a cargo when writing my thesis “Porcelain and the Dutch China Trade”. The records had given the impression of the type of porcelain the Dutch East India Company was shipping around the middle of the 18th century., and now I was eSeeing the real thing with mu very own eyes.

But if this had really come from a Dutch ship, then which East Indiaman could it be? The most obvious candidate was the Geldermalsen, which had sunk on her homeward voyage in 1752.

 

 

 

The Grey Owl Books by Wa-Sha-Quon-Asin

Pilgrims of the Wild is one of the The Grey Owl Books by Wa-Sha-Quon-Asin.  In it a “a ‘Red Indian’ tries to convey to the white man, before it is too late, some of the spirit of his vanishing race”

The Grey Owl Books by Wa-Sha-Quon-Asin

 

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Pilgrims of the Wild is the attempt of a Red Indian to convey to the White Man, before it is too late, something of the spirit of Grey Owl (Wa-Sha-Quon-Asin), trapper, guide, sniper in the Canadian Army, later officially appointed Protector of Wild Life, and world famous; and of Anahareo, daughter of a line of Iroquois chiefs.

Their journey was long and weary, beset by hardships and dangers, and undertaken without hope of gain, in obedience to a spiritual vision, the vision that somehow, somewhere, they might find a sanctuary for the last survivors of the Little People, the little friends of the Red Indian, the beaver.

Grey Owl has been compared with Gilbert White of Selborne, and the comparison between a half-breed trapper of the Canadian backwoods, and the cultured, comfortable eighteenth-century country parson, may seem far-fetched. It is not so. Common to both are an intense love of all living things, extraordinary powers of observation in simple, vivid words. The influence of Gilbert White, Patron Saint of English naturalists, has been far reaching: so already, though his work is not yet done, is that of Grey Owl. This book has added thousands to his army of friends and admirers.

Other Grey Owl Books include

A Book Of Grey Owl (Pages from the writings of Wa-Sha-Quon_Asin) (Amazon UK, Amazon USA)

This book contains a selection  from all of Grey Owl’s published writings under five headings: Sajo and Shapian, The Beaver People, On the Trail, Creatures of the Wild, and North American Indians. It is a delightful volume, beautifully produced and fully illustrated with photographs old and new as well as Grey Owl’s own sketches, representing all aspects of his many sided genius.

The Green Leaf: A Tribute to Grey Owl edited by Lovat Dickson (Amazon UK, Amazon USA)

The contents of this delightful little book – a fitting memorial to a noble life cut off in its prime – include an account of Grey Owl’s last days; his death and burial; spontaneous tributes from the Press; a selection of very revealing letters to his publisher, now printed for the first time; some unpublished Precepts and passages from the books embodying  varying aspects of his philosophy; his farewell (undelivered) broadcast to the children of Britain; and a pictorial record of his last days, including some remarkable photographs printed in photogravure.

Tales Of An Empty Cabin (Amazon UK, Amazon USA)

The cabin will be recognisable to those who have read Pilgrims of the Wild as the House of McGinnis. The ghostly firelight in the empty cabin brings back to his mind now, as it did in that winter, “some half-forgotten story or incident, or thought, and by them there nearly always hung a tale.”

“It is a unique book, profound and fascinating…..I have been able only to hint at the wealth the book contains…..a book, incontestably, to possess and to brood over, again and again.” Hugh De Selincourt in the Sunday Times

The Adventures of Sajo And Her Beaver People (Amazon UK, Amazon USA)

“I have no hesitation whatever in calling The Adventures of Sajo and her Beaver People the best tale of its kind since Black Beauty…..I cannot imagine the child, or for that matter the grown up, who will not love reading about Sajo and her beavers as much as I have loved reading about them.” Compton Mackenzie in the Daily Mail

The Tree (Amazon UK, Amazon USA)

Grey Owl’s classic story of six hundred years in the life of a tree, illustrated with his own drawings and with cover design and end papers by Webster Murray

 

Writing By Candlelight. E.P. Thomson

canfleightThe essays in this book were, with one exception, written between 1979 and 1980. They concern such matters as the miners’ strike of 1972; Sir Harold Wilson’s apologetics and the referendum about “going into Europe”; the ABC Official Secrets Trial of 1978 and the current attack on the jury system. The last two essays restate the case for policies of active neutrality. The essays vary in style and give scope for the author’s talent for satire and polemic as well as for measured political analysis. All are concerned with the means employed today to manufacture what is then offered as a consensus of “public opinion”. They are also concerned with the increasingly authoritarian measures and ideology of the British state. As Thompson writes: “For two decades the state, whether under Conservative or Labour administrations, has been taking liberties, and these liberties were ours”.

(Clicking on the picture will take you to Amazon)

 

Children’s Clothes by Clare Rose

Children's Clothes by Clare RoseClick on book to go to Amazon UK

From the swaddling bands of the seventeenth century to the designer’s fashions of today, here is a vivid history of children’s clothes over the last 200 years.

Clare Rose places children’s clothes in the widest context, relating them to adult fashion, theories of education such as those of Rousseau, society’s perception of the child, and manufacturing methods. She also examines what kinds of clothes were worn, when and by whom, what they cost, and what their wearers thought of them. Even ‘cruel’ forms of dress, it seems, such as constricting corsets and swaddling bands, expressed parents’ concern for their children. .

Children’s clothes is an accomplished reference book, widely illustrated in colour and black and white. Students of both fashion and history, teachers, collectors and anyone interested in childhood and its history will enjoy this delightful and useful book.

Clare Rose was for four years Keeper of Costumes at York Castle Museum, and tours extensively as an art lecturer. Her main interest are the history and social history of costume and textiles.

“The history of children’s clothes has sometimes been dismissed as a matter of ‘babygowns and old lace’, of interest only to the specialist. This could hardly be further from the truth. Like the other major branches of costume history, the study of children’s clothes acts as a window through which we can gain insights into the history of culture and ides, and into economic history”

 

 

Women and Work. Sheila Lewenhak

A study of women's status as workers
A study of women’s status as workers

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Women today are paid less and have lower status at work than men. In spite of legislation and pressure from the women’s movement, equality at work is still a remote possibility for most women – in the the West as much as in the third world.

Sheila Lewenhak’s controversial thesis is that it is only recently that women’s status as workers has declined. Drawing on a wide range of anthropological and historical evidence, she shows that in primitive societies women’s work was crucial to survival. Women controlled many of the key technological processes (Including the skills of early agriculture and pottery) and their position in society reflected their economic importance. With slavery, a slow decline set in, which continued through feudalism and merchant capitalism. Most recently, industrialization has dramatically reduced many women’s status, through education and demand for skilled labour have enabled to rise.

This re-examination of one of the most important aspects of women’s history casts new light on their present economic position as much as on their status in the past.

Sheila Lewenhawk was born in Colombo, Sri Lanka, and was educated at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she obtained her PH.D. She has lectured, on the history of women, at Durham, London and Strathclyde Universities and has travelled extensively including visits to North, Central and South America, the USSR and Japan.

During the 1960s Dr Lewenhak wrote economic and social history books for children. She is the author of Women and Trade Unions and has had many articles published.

The chapters in this books are as follows:

1. Hunters and Gatherers

2. Early Farmers and Herders

3. Decline of the Motherhood and Women’s Status

4. Slavery and Settled Farming

5. Towns and Specialization

6. Feudalism and Self-Employment

7. Women and Trade

8. Colonies, Population and Professional Work

9. The Industrial Revolution

10. The Spread of the Industrial Revolution Worldwide

11 Women’s Industrial Organization

12 The First World War and the Russian Revolution

13. Women Workers in Industrial Countries between the Wars

14. The Second World War and Post War Labour Shortage

15. Women Workers in Traditional Technologies

16. Women’s Liberation and New Technologies.

A Short History Of Pembroke College Cambridge.

Pembroke

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The author of this short history had already spent several years preparing material for what would have been a far more comprehensive book, a definitive history of the College. It was only at the repeated requests of friends that he began the writing of this smaller volume. At his death in July 1935 the book was in typescript as far as the end of the eighteenth century, and the first portion of the final chapter had been drafted. Mr S C Roberts, his literary executor, had prepared the book for publication and hd added and introduction and a postscript.

Pembroke_0002

Narses the Eunuch.

Goths

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The sixth century in Italy, with its lengthening shadows of the Dark Ages, could still claim enlightened names such as Theodoric the Great, Boethius and, at its end, Pope Gregory the Great. The East Roman Empire at Constantinople, was ruled by Justinian 1, with his consort Theodora, ably served by the minister of justice, Tribonia, and the great general Belisarius who had retaken North Africa from the Vandals and attempted the reconquest of Italy.

On a par with all these, and serving as a link, was a small Armenian who has largely been forgotten by later historians. Narses the Eunuch served as a court official in Constantinople  for most of his life, rising to the position of Grand Chamberlain and trusted confident of the Emperor. His survival for so long in such a hot-bed of intrigue as the Byzantine Court is unusual enough, but in 551AD, when he was well into his seventies, Narses succeeded. The powerful Ostrogoth Kingdom of Italy was destroyed and the Goths were driven from the history books.

Narses then defeated an invasion by the Franks and Alammani. These feats alone should have marked him for greatness but, despite ruling as Regent over the newly unified Italy for a further twelve years, Narses has slipped from his rightful place among the great personalities who stand at this cross-roads in the devleopment of post-Roman Europe

L.H. Fauber was born in Virginia, USA. He is a professional researcher now living in England, and has worked extensively on both sides of the Atlantic. One area has been “Institutionalised Eunuchism’ and this has involved research at the universities of Harvard, Hawaii and McGill. For this particular book Fauber conducted further research at Harvard and the British Library, and undertook ten months ‘fieldwork’ in Italy.

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